Tag Archive | dinner

Curry for the unadventurous

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Image source: Flickr. Matt Oldfield. The kitchen UWRF13. Wikimedia Commons.

 

Well hello there. My, what a time is has been! We have feasted, we have frolicked and we have made merry. We have roasted, fried, dipped, marinated, drizzled, boiled, crushed, glazed, baked, squeezed and sprinkled until we are fit to burst. I have (ironically) been so busy in the kitchen over the festive period that I haven’t even had time to write about it. The good news is that the fruits of my labours have provided lots of new recipes and tips to tell you all about in time for next year.

But for now, February…

Oh.

As I write this at 4pm the sun is just caressing the horizon, gilding the neighbours’ Cypress tree with warm light. Below, the pond is frozen solid and slivers of frost still linger in the shady patches of ground. This time of year is often undeniably beautiful yet we seem do our best to hate it anyway. In my daily life, I rarely encounter anyone with a good word to say about February. All of the fresh January enthusiasm has faded leaving ice on the car windscreen and a fridge full of wilting salad. I totally understand the compulsion to feel healthy after the splurge of December. I for one am craving apples. I normally hate apples. But I have never got to grips with the whole raw vegetables thing when it below zero outside. Surely, I think, there must be a better way. And I think I have found it in curry.

I would love to know more about cooking curry but have always been held back by the long lists of unfamiliar ingredients involved and a vague terror of making things too spicy. (IBS will do that to you) Despite liking the idea of curry the furthest I was prepared to venture in the past was a mild chicken korma. Even black pepper on my dinner was living wild as far as I was concerned. My husband however can tolerate food so hot that the sales assistant in our local spice shop once speculated that there must be something wrong with him.

Over the last couple of years of cooking together and trying to find a middle ground between our tastes I have gradually increased my tolerance for spice without really knowing it. So much so that the other day while eating one of my standard chicken with super-mild-korma-sauce-from-jar I was actually moved to get up out of my comfy chair to add some extra chilli powder before I even realised what I was doing.

Curry for me embodies everything you need on a cold February day. It’s colourful, warming and can be filled with fresh vegetables. Some ingredients in curries (i.e. ginger) can also be good for battling the dreaded plague demons that regularly beset us fragile mortals at this time of year. (Plus, it sort of looks like witches’ brew and that pleases me greatly. Sometimes it’s all I can do not to cackle manically as I stir a cauldron of bubbling curry on the stove).

So, I propose a quest. An adventure into the world of curry for the chronically unadventurous. Join me as I start by re-tracing my steps through the easy, mild curries that I am familiar with and then boldly venturing into delicious and unchartered realms. I’ll go and get the ingredients, you check back for the start of the quest soon!

(insert manic cackle here)

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Autumn Leaves pie

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vegetarian/gluten free/lactose free/can be made vegan

No, we have not taken vegetarianism this far, don’t worry. I have not (yet) resorted to eating fallen leaves from my garden. I just named this pie “Autumn leaves” because the colours remind me of autumn and I wanted to sound really clever.

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Look at the vegetables before they’re added to the sauce – aren’t they pretty?

This is a lovely, warming pie for a cold evening. It’s relatively easy to make but rather time consuming to prepare so maybe one for a Sunday afternoon when it’s raining and you want an excuse not to leave your nice cosy kitchen.

A warning: When I was shopping for ingredients to make this a few weeks ago I got very excited because next to the usual butternut squashes in the supermarket they had something called coquina squash. It looked the exactly same but was far more expensive, labelled as part of the supermarket’s premium range. Naturally, assuming it must be a far superior exotic squash variety, I bought it, only to find out when I got home that coquina is just another name for butternut squash. Probably you’re all now rolling in the aisles at my silly squashy ignorance but I thought it fair to mention.

Recipe Tips

  • In the pictures, the purple that you can see is purple carrot. I used these as I had some left over from Halloween and I’m a bit obsessed with purple vegetables. I might hesitate to do so if serving this to guests however as they turned the cooked pie filling a rather strange shade of pink. This pie works with any root vegetables really as long as you make sure they’re roasted first to soften them and eliminate excess moisture. Roast peppers or sundried tomatoes also work very well.
  • The best tip for making gluten-free pastry that I’ve ever come across was from a book about pies that friend owned. I wish I could remember the name of it. Next time I see her I’ll find out so I can link to it here because it was a very good book. The tip was to add polenta to the mix of flour. It gives the pastry a fantastic flavour, helps to hold it together and creates a warm yellow colour that makes a welcome change from the usual paleness of gluten-free pastry. Polenta is sometimes called cornmeal and it’s the fine ground, uncooked kind that you want. Most supermarkets these days stock it but you might have to hunt for a bit – try the “word foods” section.
  • If you want to make the pastry completely vegan it is totally ok to leave out the egg – just add a little more water instead. The pastry will be slightly crumblier if you do this as the egg acts as a binder. If you want to avoid this, you can use vegan egg replacer (just follow the instructions on the packet) or chia seeds. See this excellent tutorial for how to do this http://www.foodrenegade.com/how-make-egg-substitute-chia-seeds/
  • Adding the xanthan gum is absolutely vital if you want it to stick together. I’ve also found that adding Lactofree cheese to the pastry, apart from making it taste great, helps to hold it together as well.
  • Unfortunately, even with all the xanthan gum and will in the world, gluten free pastry is never going to look pretty. The best you can hope for is “charmingly rustic”. It will still try to fall apart when you lift it onto the pie and you will never get it rolled thinly. One easy way to get the pastry onto the pie in one piece is to roll it out on a plastic mat or chopping board, then quickly turn it upside down onto the pie.
  • So, you could just leave it OR if you’ve got guests coming over, you’ve had enough wine to pretend you’re a contestant on the Great British Bake Off or you’re photographing it for a food blog and want to look like you know what you’re doing, you could jazz it up a bit. Here are some ideas to impress those Bake Off judges with:

– Use the inevitable little bits of pastry left over and some cookie cutters to cover over the unsightly areas with pretty shapes. (Leaves in this case)

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– Use a knife to gently score patterns into the pastry.

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– Make the rough edges look deliberately quaint and homespun by squishing them all along with a fork. Put it on a gingham tablecloth for added effect.

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  • Note: The method for making the pastry that I’ll give is the old-fashioned version. I don’t actually do this because if you have a food processor you can just chuck all of the pastry ingredients in there at once and press the “on” switch. The future is here.

 

Ingredients

(To make one pie that serves roughly 4 people)

 

Pastry

  • 6oz gluten-free plain flour mix
  • 3oz fine cornmeal (polenta)
  • 1 tsp xanthan gum
  • 5oz vegan margarine
  • 1 egg (or substitute)
  • 2tbs cold water
  • A handful of Lactofree cheese (optional)

 

Sauce

  • ½ pint milk or milk substitute (Soya milk works well, as does Lactofree)
  • 3 heaped tablespoons of cornflour
  • 4oz cheddar cheese (melty vegan or Lactofree extra mature work fine)
  • Salt and pepper
  • A pinch of Herbes de Provence
  • 1 teaspoon English mustard

 

Filling

  • Half a butternut squash
  • 3 medium carrots
  • 1 medium courgette
  • A handful of sundried tomatoes
  • I small packet of Quorn chunks

 

Method

 

  1. Prepare the vegetables.

    pie-2

    More pretty colours…

 

Peel the carrots and squash (or any other root veg/peppers) and cut into bite sized cubes. Place on a roasting tray (I cover it in tin foil to save washing up if I’m short for time) and roast on 200C/400F/Gas Mark 6 for about half an hour or until the edges start to brown. Chop the courgette into very small cubes and put straight into the pie dish with any extras like the sundried tomatoes.

 

  1. Meanwhile, make the pastry…

 

  • Mix together the dry ingredients in a bowl.
  • Add the fat straight out of the fridge so that it is as cold as possible and cut it up into small chunks before adding it the bowl. Using the tips of your fingers, rub the fat into the flour until it resembles fine breadcrumbs.
  • Add the egg (or substitute) and work it into the mixture with a spoon. Gradually add some water, just a little bit at a time, gently kneading the dough with your hands until it forms one solid ball.

    pie-4

    If you’re using a food processor the dough should look roughly like this when it’s done.

 

Remind you of anything? That’s right – it’s the same method as the one we used for the pizza, just slightly different ingredients. Turns out the component parts of many different recipes are pretty much the same – once you learn the basic skills they’re easy to remember and adapt.

 

  1. And the sauce? This is exactly the same as the one for macaroni cheese. It’s a Mornay (cheese) sauce.

 

To save you reading that recipe twice, (although if you haven’t yet, please do) here it is again. Thank you, copy and paste function:

 

  • Mix the cornflour with a little of the milk in a glass until it dissolves.
  • Add the milk to the carrot water (if a lot has boiled off you might need to top it up – you should have roughly 1 pint of liquid in total)
  • Add the salt, pepper and herbs.
  • Heat until it starts to simmer then remove from the heat.
  • Tip in the cornflour and stir. (A balloon whisk can help here) pie-1
  • Return the pan to the heat and keep stirring until the sauce thickens.
  • Grate and add the cheese. Stir until it melts.
  • Add the mustard and a generous pinch of yeast flakes.

 

  1. Now put it all together…

 

  • Put the vegetables and sauce in a large pie dish with thin slices or tiny cubes of the courgette – as small as you can get them.

 

  • If you have one, pop a pie funnel in the middle of the pie.

 

  • Roll out the pastry on a floured surface and transfer to the top of the pie. Trim the edges with a knife and cut an X shape in the centre and use it to make a little hole – either for the pie funnel to poke out of or just as it is to release some of the steam.

 

  • Decorate as you prefer. If you have any holes or bits that don’t quite look nice you cn cover them up with the extra bits of pastry like I have in the corner here.
  • pie-6

    Fixing the broken bit on the corner to make it look deliberate…

 

  • Bake at 180C/350F/Gas Mark 4 for half an hour or until the top has browned slightly and the vegetables are cooked through.
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All done!

Cheesy vegetable bake

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Vegetable bake with Quorn sausages

vegetarian/gluten free/lactose free/can be made vegan

One week until the end of the month. That means it’s time to get creative. We may not have any money right now but what we do have is a tray full of mushrooms that are on the turn, half a loaf of stale bread and a couple of wrinkly peppers. What more does a girl need?

I don’t know exactly what this recipe is. It’s one I inherited from my Mum and in our house it was just called “veggie dish”. It’s sort of a delicious baked vegetable mush with a cheesy crispy, topping. It’s great for those times when you have a load of old odds and ends rattling around in the fridge and not much money in your bank account.

Assuming that bears had raided your kitchen and you had to buy every single ingredient in this recipe from a mid-range supermarket (I used Sainsburys prices to work this out) the cost would be roughly £4.50. This gives 4 portions at £1.12 each which is pretty good considering how nutritious it is. I love it because it uses up ingredients that I often have in anyway and prevents any waste.

In my local Sainsburys the celery, peppers, courgettes and mushroom are all cheaper to buy in gigantic packets than they are individually. This seems like a bizarre system to me and a silly waste of plastic but what do I know? I just take advantage of it while I can.

 

Recipe Tips

  • This one really works best if you have a food processor. I have made it without and it tastes just fine but you don’t quite get the same texture and the chopping takes ages. If you are doing this without a food processor you will need really stale bread to make the breadcrumb; it has to be totally dried out or else it just won’t work, especially if that bread is shop-bought gluten free.
  • If you’re like me and hate green peppers then this is an excellent way to disguise them. Also, despite the vast quantities of mushrooms in this, my husband who hates mushrooms cannot tell they’re in it.
  • If you want to make this vegan, then just leave out the egg or use egg replacer/chia seeds. It’s not a vital ingredient; it just helps to bind it.
  • My Mum’s version of this recipe used an onion, not a courgette but as I cannot eat onions in large amounts courgette is a good replacement.
  • This can be served with pretty much anything. I like it with sausages or with baked beans and half a jacket potato.

 

Ingredients

  • 2 peppers – 1 red and 1 green works best
  • 3 sticks of celery
  • 12oz mushrooms
  • 1 medium courgette
  • 6oz cheddar cheese (Lactofree or vegan cheddar style)
  • 8oz stale bread (brown is best)
  • 1 egg (or substitute)
  • A pinch of salt and pepper
  • Vegetable oil

Method

  1. Chop the vegetables as fine as you can. Use a food processor if possible.

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2. Fry the vegetables in a little vegetable oil for about 5mins.veggie-dish-3

3. Either use a food processor to turn the bread into breadcrumbs or rub it between your fingers.

4. Grate the cheese.

5. Beat the egg a little in a cup with the salt and pepper and add to the mixture.

 

 

6. Add 6oz of the breadcrumbs and 4oz of the cheese to the mixture.

 

7. Stir everything in and cook for another couple of minutes.

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8. Put the mixture into an ovenproof baking dish and smooth down. Sprinkle the remaining cheese and breadcrumbs over the top.

 

 

 

9. Bake at 180C/350F/Gas Mark 4 for 25 minutes or until the top is browned and crispy.veggie-dish-2

 

Simple Vegetable “Risotto” with Pesto

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vegetarian/vegan/gluten free/lactose free

We are recovering from a nasty bug here at the moment. My husband has been sick all week and I have felt stranger than a blue hippopotamus with wings.

Despite being nominally hungry the very thought of cooking makes me want to leap out of the kitchen window. It’s hard to know what to do when you’re feeling sick. Should you eat properly to keep your strength up or should you follow your first instinct and hide under a blanket with a bag of crisps until it all goes away?

My go-to choice for times like these is a simple vegetable risotto. This can be made as safe and bland or as exotic and exciting as you need. It doesn’t use too many ingredients and is quick to prepare. This isn’t the proper way to make an authentic Italian risotto, especially since I always insist on ruining the suble flavours by adding large amounts pesto at the end – this recipe is probably more accurately described as “risotto rice with mixed veg”  – but it is tasty, nutritious and very easy to make.

Recipe Tips.

  • This recipe can be made with whatever vegetables you have lurking in the fridge, which is especially handy if you’ve been feeling too ill to get to the shops. I have used pepper, courgette and kale here because that’s what I had to hand but pretty much anything goes. If you are planning on using root vegetables however they may need to be pre-cooked as they do take longer to cook through.
  • I like to add a protein element to my vegetable risottos. Here I’ve used some Quorn chunks, vegetarian hot dogs and mixed seeds but you could try nuts, tofu or any other vegetarian meat substitute. Or, of course, there’s meat if you’re not vegetarian. Chicken is probably best. If you are using meat this will require a longer cooking time so it’s be best to add that before the veg instead of after.
  • At the end, I like to add extras for flavour such as pesto and/or cheese but you don’t have to.

Ingredients

(To serve 2 people)

  • 200g Arborio risotto rice
  • Approx 700ml boiling water
  • A vegetable stock cube (gluten free)
  • A pinch of mixed Italian herbs
  • Salt and pepper
  • A splash of white wine – optional – (about half a glass should do it)
  • Mixed vegetables. I generally use: a red pepper, half a courgette, a handful or kale or spinach, half a carrot.
  • A jar of tomato pesto (gluten/dairy free brand)
  • A handful of grated cheese (vegan or Lactofree if necessary)

Method

  • Peel and/or chop the vegetables into small cubes.
  • Fry the vegetables in a little oil for a couple of minutes until they start to soften.
  • Add any protein, if desired, and fry with the vegetables. (If using meat, a longer cooking time may be required – you may need to add it before the veg.

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  • Meanwhile, make up 700ml of vegetable stock by adding boiling water to a stock cube. Add the herbs and seasoning to the stock.
  • Add the uncooked rice to the pan and fry with the vegetables for 1-2 minutes.
  • Add a splash of wine if desired and stir until the wine disappears.
  • Add a splash of the stock to the pan, stir and reduce the heat. Allow to simmer (you should see gentle little bubbles, not big violent ones).

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  • When the stock has disappeared, add a little more. Keep doing this until the rice is cooked through – taste it to check – and all the stock has been absorbed. (The amount of time this takes and how much stock you need will vary depending on how absorbent and quick-cooking your ingredients are. As a rough guide this should take around 15 minutes)
  • Add the kale or spinach and cook for a few minutes until softened.
  • Add any extras such as pesto, cream or grated cheese. Continue to cook until these are melted/absorbed/dissolved.

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  • Enjoy and feel better.

 

Saturday Night Pizza

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Mmm…egg, Quorn and mixed veg

gluten free/vegetarian/ lactose free/can be made vegan

In preparation for the weekend, I bring you… homemade pizza. This is our Saturday night treat and my own spin on the one my Mum used to make for us growing up.

When I made this the other week I was talking to my Mum on the phone as I made the bases, absentmindedly adding the familiar ingredients to my food processor while balancing the phone between ear and shoulder. Normally this recipe is one I can virtually make in my sleep, however this time something went wrong. While I was distracted by the tale of Mum’s near-forensic removal of every fuchsia in her new garden and their subsequent herbaceous replacements I forgot one vital thing.

In horror I watched as, instead of coming together satisfyingly to form a smooth ball in the food processor, the dough rapidly separated into soggy breadcrumbs that resembled nothing so much as curdled cheese. I tipped it out onto the work surface in an attempt to kneed it into submission but the crumbs not only refused to submit, they defiantly bounced all over the kitchen in a bid for freedom. I told my Mum I would have to phone her back; this was a disaster that needed my undivided attention. I contemplated the disintegrated mess with the sort of dismay usually reserved for a small-scale nuclear war. Why? Why? What went wrong? And then it hit me.

Xanthan gum.

Gluten free friends, heed ye this warning! If you have ever doubted the efficacy of adding extra xanthan gum to your gluten free flour believe in it’s awesome power now!

Xanthan gum is a magical substance that acts as binder in gluten-free baking – it basically mimics what the gluten would normally do. It seems like such a little thing to add to your cooking – just a teaspoon of innocuous white powder – what could it possibly be doing? It’s not until you forget it that you can truly see its effects.

In the end, I scraped the mixture back into the machine, added the extra xanthan gum and a few desert spoons of flour and it was just fine, if a little doughy when cooked. A happy ending for a hungry gardening enthusiast.

Recipe Tips

  • This is a scone base so it is a little different from a traditional pizza in that it is much thicker and more filling but it’s still just as delicious. I use a food processor for this recipe to save time but you can do it the traditional way just as well. The polenta in the recipe is optional – you can just use 8oz of flour instead of 6oz – but I find the polenta gives it a lighter texture and a nicer taste.
  • If you want to make the base vegan you can replace the egg with any of the following: a little more soya milk, vegan egg replacer, chia seed goo, or a handful of grated “melty” vegan cheese. The last three will help to bind the mixture in the same way that the egg would. If you go for the soya milk option be prepared for a slightly crumblier base.
  • The vegan cheese I use is a brand specially designed to be “melty” and suitable for pizza. I have found however that it only does this if you put it directly onto the tomato sauce, before the rest of the toppings. If you sprinkle it right on top it just goes crispy. (Also nice in its own way if you like crispy cheese) I do a combination of both for a crispy cheese top and molten under-layer of deliciousness.

Ingredients

To make two large gluten/dairy free pizzas.

Base

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A giant ball of dough

  • 12oz self-raising flour (gluten free mix)
  • 4oz polenta
  • 2tsp xanthan gum
  • 4oz vegan spread
  • 2 eggs (or substitute)
  • Large pinch of salt and pepper
  • Large pinch of Italian herb mix
  • Soya milk (or substitute)

Tomato sauce for 2 pizzas

  • A jar of tomato passata (or tin of chopped tomatoes if using the food processor)
  • A teaspoon of salt and a teaspoon of sugar (optional if you are sugar-free, but does bring out the flavour)
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • A teaspoon Italian herb mix
  • A shake of salt and pepper
  • Optional extras to be added at the dictates of whimsy and the contents of your kitchen cupboard include: garlic, red wine, concentrated tomato puree, fresh tomatoes, red peppers.

 

Traditional method…

  1. Mix together the dry ingredients in a bowl.
  2. Add the fat straight out of the fridge so that it is as cold as possible and cut it up into small chunks before adding it the bowl. Using the tips of your fingers, rub the fat into the flour until it resembles fine breadcrumbs.
  3. Add the egg and work it into the mixture with a spoon. Gradually add some soy milk or water, just a little bit at a time, gently kneading the dough with your hands until it forms one solid ball. Wrap in cling film and leave in the fridge for about half an hour (this step is optional but does help when rolling it out)
  4. Roll out into a pizza shape on a baking tray lined with greaseproof paper, as thin as you can before it starts falling apart. (It will probably crumble a little around the edges, if this happens just fold them back in and roll again. Using your fingers can be easier than a rolling pin at this stage)

    pizza1

    The base

For the sauce…

Locate bowl. Mix ingredients in bowl. Gosh that was complicated.

Alternatively…

  1. To make the base, gleefully tip everything into the food processor, turn on and marvel at the wonders of technology. Gradually add some milk or water, just a little bit at a time until the mixture comes together to form one solid ball. Wrap and chill the dough.
  2. Pop the tomato sauce ingredients into the food processor (I might give it a quick wipe first but it’s usually fine as it is) and pulse for a few seconds to mix and chop the sauce more finely.

Add the toppings of your choice.

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Toppings…

In my house this can be any combination from the following list but your pizza can be as creative as you are.

I like: vegan “pizza” cheese, vegan cream cheese, peppers, mushrooms, courgette, aubergine, mixed seafood, smoked mackerel, egg, ham, pineapple, vegetarian hot dogs, Quorn chunks, bacon, anchovies, olives, spinach…

…Maybe one day I should try them all at once and see what happens…

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Before cooking

Bake at 180C/350F/Gas Mark 4 for approximately half an hour.

Cottage Pie

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Gluten free/vegetarian/lactose free/can be made vegan

Last night felt like a cottage pie sort of night. You know, cold, crisp, generally autumnal. Cottage pie is an easy variation of the all-purpose bolognaise base although when making cottage pie I definitely like to make sure I add red wine to the mix. Of course, then I do have to drink the rest of the bottle. You know, to stop it going off. It’s a selfless act that somebody has to do.

Method

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Make the all-purpose bolognaise base.

Place in a deep casserole dish and spread a generous layer of mashed potato on top. Make a criss-cross pattern in it with a fork and sprinkle on a little grated cheese.

I then like to put it on a baking tray covered with tin foil to catch the inevitable drips that bubble over and cement themselves to the bottom of your oven if you don’t catch them in time.

Bake at 180C/350F/Gas Mark 4 for roughly half an hour (depending how crispy you like your topping).

All-purpose vegetarian bolognaise base

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vegetarian/gluten free/lactose free/can be made vegan

This is a really easy way to start lots of different recipes. It is basically a vegetarian bolognaise-plus, packed with flavour and good-for-you feelings. You can practically taste the vitamins. Use it as it is for spaghetti bolognaise or combine it with other stuff for dishes such as lasagne or chilli con carne.

I am not vegetarian myself but I much prefer to use this recipe rather than standard mince and many people I have served this to never even guess that it’s vegetarian. When I was growing up my Mum used to produce batches of this and freeze it for a handy quick-start to dinner on busy days. I normally just make slightly more than I need each time and freeze a portion or two.

Recipe Tips

  • The vegetables that you add to this can actually be really varied, it’s great for using up all of that old veg that accumulates in the back of the fridge. I like to swap out the celery for mushrooms when my mushroom-hating husband isn’t eating it and add some aubergine too. Just experiment and see what you prefer. If you cannot eat onion/garlic it is possible to omit the ingredients containing it from this recipe with no adverse effects – you might just want to add a bit more of the other flavoursome ingredients)
  • The Quorn mince that I use is not vegan as it contains egg however many supermarkets do their own brand of vegetarian mince that is vegan – I know Sainsburys do, you might just need to shop around. Or, if you’d rather omit the mince altogether it’s just as nice with extra veg added instead. Mushroom is good substitute I think.
  • At the time of writing, standard Marmite contains barley but not wheat, which is fine for me but not for the totally gluten-free. For bizarre reasons which I can’t quite fathom, their vegetarian version however does contain wheat. Again, supermarket own brands often have different ingredients so it might be worth double checking. If you really can’t find any that’s gluten free and/or vegan don’t worry – it’s totally optional. Try some vegan yeast flakes instead or just add another stock cube.
  • The cooking times on this can also vary depending on how much time you have. This recipe can be cooked pretty quickly (as given in the instructions) or left to gently simmer for longer. I prefer this option as I like my veg thoroughly cooked and I think it gives a better favour. I either use the slow cooker for this or fry everything up in a wok with a lid instead of a frying pan, pop the lid on, turn the temperature to the lowest setting and leave it for about half an hour or more, checking occasionally and stirring to prevent it sticking to the bottom of the pan.

Makes 5-6 portions

Basic Ingredients

  • A packet of Quorn mince
  • 1 large sweet pepper (I prefer red but whatever colour’s your preference)
  • A couple of sticks of celery
  • 1 medium courgette
  • 1 carrot
  • 2 tins of chopped tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons of concentrated tomato puree
  • A tablespoon of Marmite or Vegemite
  • Salt and pepper
  • Italian herb mix

Optional Ingredients for added flavour

  • 1 small onion
  • A couple of cloves of garlic
  • A vegetable stock cube (most contain garlic)
  • Worcester Sauce (most brands contain garlic)
  • A splash of red wine
  • A pinch of paprika

 

Method

  1. Chop the vegetables into small cubes. Fry on a medium heat with a drizzle of veg oil until they start to brown and soften (usually about 5-10mins)

    img_20150112_045237

    Colourful veg tastes better…

  2. Add the mince still frozen, straight from the packet. Stir in and cook for another couple of minutes.
  3. Add the chopped tomatoes, tomato puree, marmite, Worcester sauce, the stock cube, herbs and seasonings. Stir in.
  4. Turn the heat down and simmer gently for another 10-15 minutes.